CentOS 5.8 NetInstall

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.

Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.

When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.8/os/i386

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.8/os/x86_64


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CentOS 5.4 NetInstall

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.

Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.

When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.4/os/i386/

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.4/os/x86_64/


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How To Mount NTFS disks on CentOS

Type this command to determine your kernel version:

[root@lnx ~]# uname -r
2.6.18-128.el5

Download the NTFS kernel modules from:
http://www.linux-ntfs.org/doku.php?id=redhat:rhel5

The current kernel module version of my system at the time of this writing was:
kernel-module-ntfs-2.6.18-128.el5-2.1.27-0.rr.10.11.i686.rpm

Install the RPM :

rpm -ihv kernel-module-ntfs-2.6.18-128.el5-2.1.27-0.rr.10.11.i686.rpm

 

Load the kernel module :

modprobe ntfs

 

Find the disk info : fdisk -l

One partition should be mentionned as HPFS/NTFS

 

Mount the partition :

mkdir /g_drive

mount -t ntfs /dev/hdb2 /g_drive

That’s it!


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How to Clone USB Device on a Linux/Unix System

 

A friend once wrote me requesting this tutorial on how to clone an USB storage drive on a second USB device. The aim is to produce identical copy of the original. To achieve this, we need a Linux or UNIX system. We are going to be using Fedora Linux for the purpose of this tutorial.

 

Follow these simple steps:

 

1.) Login into the system as a regular user

2.) Switch to root by typing: 

     $su –

3.) Enter the root password

4.) Plug in the source USB and type at the prompt:

     fdisk -l to see what device name the source USB has

     (this may appear as /dev/sdb)

5.) Plug in the destination USB and type at the prompt:

     fdisk -l to see what device name the destination USB has

     (this may appear as /dev/sdc)

6.) Once you have both names determined, simply type the following:

     dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sdc conv=notrunc

     (as we do not want to truncate the output file, we simple use the option notrunc)

   
    The result of this command is an identical copy of the original USB device.

 

    To make an image of the entire drive including MBR (boot files), type in terminal:

    dd if=/dev/sdb of=/path/to/destination/image.dd conv=notrunc.

 

    To restore the image to a new drive seen as /dev/sdc:

    dd if=/path/to/image.dd of=/dev/sdc conv=notrunc

 


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